Tag Archives: Nathan Drake

Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End (2016) Video Game Review

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Right, we’re now on the last game of the Nathan Drake series known as Uncharted 4 A Thief’s End.  What is entailed when it’s called a thief’s end?  So much is left up for interpretation.  But that’s for you to witness.  So here we go.

Our story starts with Nathan Drake on a boat in the middle of the ocean with another man by the name of Sam.  The sea is incredibly rough due to a huge storm, and they are being chased by a huge militia.  Their boat is basically destroyed.  Several flashbacks happen to provide us with some more backstory to Nathan, including his time at the Catholic Orphanage and his time in prison in the late 90s.  We then see where Nate is, several years after the events of Uncharted 3 – He’s now retired from adventure and living an honest life working as a diver for a Marine Salvaging company.  He’s back with Elena, and their life is nice…but a bit boring for them.  However a job offered to Nathan in Malaysia seems to provide him with some excitement…His life then changes when Sam – his older brother, whom he thought dead, has returned with a request. He broke out of jail with the help of a ruthless man, who wants a huge payout from Sam in exchange for his life, through treasure.  The treasure?  Henry Avery’s $400 million fortune from the 1695 gun heist – a huge stash that has allured the brother since they were teenagers.  Reluctant at first, then giving into temptation – Nathan lies to Elena, saying he is taking the job in Malaysia – and with the help of Sully, they head to Italy to retrieve their first clue – the St Dismas Cross (a wooden idol of the thief to whom Jesus Christ said “On this day you’ll be with me in paradise”).

Now to venture into the details:

The graphics…The graphics are absolutely amazing, as it not only surpassed what The Last Of Us had accomplished, but it managed to be easily 1 of the best looking games on the PS4.  Much like the original trilogy was on the PS3 (before it was remastered on the PS4), it flows at the cinematic frame rate of 30 frames per second (The trilogy flows at 60FPS on the PS4) which provides a nice touch…and when you consider the size and detail of the game…maybe it’s for the best at this time, unless the Playstation 5 offered a 60 frames version.

The art style is absolutely inspired!  So much variety in the scenery, so much to look at.  A truly organic looking game.  I really went all out with the game’s Photo Mode.  Adoring everything that was presented to me, and almost wishing it was real.

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This view…

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This inside joke…

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This mood…

The gameplay…if you didn’t think they could have upped the gameplay from Uncharted 2, you’re in for a surprise.  Along with Nate’s melee attacks being improved yet again, We’re also given new ways of attacking and getting around.  You now have the option of driving, whether it be by boat or by jeep (rather than just being the gunman all the time), the ability to take out hordes of soldiers using only stealth (much like Metal Gear games), and of course…the grappling hook.  Which adds more to the puzzle aspects of the exploration.  I had an incredible amount of fun with this, and didn’t feel any boredom from it.

The music for the first time in the series’ history is not done by Greg Edmundson, but rather Henry Jackman, whose CV includes Kingsmen: The Secret Service, Big Hero 6 and both Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Civil War.  To be very clear, this doesn’t stop the game from having a highly memorable score in its own right.  By not having its original theme song, it instantly suggests a change in direction or simply something new…and that something new is from being played on the next generation system.

Uncharted 4 has a bittersweetness to it when you consider that Amy Hennig, the Director and 1 of the 3 writers of the original trilogy, wasn’t involved in this game.  However, despite her absence, the story is excellent.  Really excellent in fact.  If you’ve journeyed with these characters before, then you’ll notice that this is the series’ storytelling at its most advance and well polished.  While The Golden Abyss was full of one-upmanship in dialogue – Uncharted 4 managed to make this game absolutely hilarious.  The banter between all of them, not just Nate, Sully and Sam, is fantastic.  It remembers the importance of fun, but at the same time it manages to avoid some cliches.  This game is also where you see Nate and Elena’s relationship at its most mature, as it is here we see Elena’s greatest acceptance of who Nate is and what he does, as well as Nate’s feeling that he really has something to lose.  The main villains, Rafe Adler and Nadine Ross, would in their own right be pretty scary.  Rafe is a smirking, selfish, millionaire psychopath who reminds me of pro wrestler Mike “The Miz” Mizanin, while Nadine, a paramilitary leader, is more or less a South African Melina May – You don’t get into a fist fight with her.

Would I recommend Uncharted 4?  Yes – if you’re a human being.  Uncharted 4 took what made every instalment before it great, and created what is likely the best possible outcome.  It’s refined, yet with more to see and do.  It’s possibly 1 of the funniest games I’ve ever played.  So full of life and intrigue.  If this is the last time we ever play as Nathan Drake, I don’t mind, because it might never be topped.  An absolute pleasure of a video game.

Graphics: *****

Art Style: *****

Voice Acting: *****

Characters: *****

Story: *****

Music: *****

Gameplay: *****

Overall: *****

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Uncharted: Golden Abyss (2011) Video Game Review

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We’re nearing an end here people…This is the second last Uncharted game that I’ll be covering for a while.  After this, it will be Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End, and when Uncharted: The Lost Legacy becomes available…well, you know the gist of it.

Released about a month or 2 after Uncharted 3 came out on the PS3, The Golden Abyss was 1 of the first games for the Playstation Vita, and 1 that stood out for utilising the Vita’s unique controls.  What’s our story?  Well, it’s a prequel to Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune.  Before Nathan ever met Elena, Chloe, Charlie, Eddy Raja or Harry Flynn (or so it seems), he knew Jason Dante, a smart-mouth used-car salesman archetype who happens to be pretty rich and capable of hiring an army as part of his work as an explorer (He also reminds me of the actor Saverio Guerra).  The other is Marisa Chase, who happens to be Dante’s partner, but who also doesn’t trust him.  The game is set in some old ruins in Panama, where Chase is trying to retrace her Grandfather’s steps.  Her grandfather, Vincent Perez, had found an amulet that was connected to the site and could lead to treasure.  However it becomes clear that Dante was doing more than he let on, as he reveals his partner isn’t Chase, but rather the paranoid, power-hungry warlord known as Roberto Guerro.

Now to discuss what parts are golden and what are of the abyss…or somewhere in between:

First of all, the graphics.  This game is the definition of what it means to play a PS3 on a handheld console.  It is very, very impressive, even to this day.  We’ve come a long way from Game Boy Color.

The art style could be best determined as this:  This is a Handheld game, therefore to save space, it is sometimes better if you have less to look at.  In this case, it comes with the visual variety.  Part of the appeal to Uncharted games is that the setting and backgrounds are constantly changing, with many numerous scenarios that could act as “levels” (or Chapters).  We would be given the insides of houses, museums, city streets, ancient ruins, mansions, beaches, mountains, jungles, trains, airports, undergrounds, rain, snow, shine, day and night, from seemingly all over the globe, and they make each game very different due to the chosen locations.  What makes The Golden Abyss different to the rest of the series in this area is the fact that you get the jungle, ruins, rivers, the inside of storehouses, small villages, caves, and cutscenes of Chases’ museum-like home…and that’s it.  The other games are a wild goose chase around the globe, and feel as such.  Here, our characters know that any treasure they’re looking for is in this area, but it’s a matter of ‘where, right here’.  Some could even argue that this feels like it begins in the middle of an Uncharted game, but the fact that the 1st half or so is a flashback will say otherwise.  Is it still a pretty game?  Yes, and it looks fantastic on handheld.  But the lack of things to see  when compared to the rest of the series could make the game feel a bit long.

The characters in general are at least as good, if not better, than Uncharted 1.  But it’s not in league with 2, 3 and 4.  It’s nice to see more of Drake and Sully, but this feels like a filler episode for these characters.  If 1, 2 and 3 (and 4) were their big, big adventures, then this was 1 of their more typical heists.  Nathan and Sully’s banter was the highlight of the game’s dialogue.  Jason Dante is a good “pest/asshole villain” in the sense that you wouldn’t mind shutting him up and dislike his decision to wear endangered species on his feet.  Chase isn’t a bad female lead, and is very different to Elena and Chloe in the sense that what she is involved in is literally out of her league – Unlike Elena and Chloe, she has little experience in fighting, and is very much book-smart.  She can even come across as a bit naive and a daydreamer – at times walking the thin line of confident and stupid…Which can be argued as a quality of Nate – but Nate is a professional in the other necessary qualities.  Guerro is your typical paranoid, power hungry maniac who would be a dictator in a corrupt government on some island south of Florida or India who would plaster his image on every street corner, and fit in well as El Presidente in the Tropico game series.  Not much else to say about him.

The voice acting, despite the lack of pauses in dialogue, is actually very good.  The writer could be seen as to blame more so than the actors, but they went with what they were given and did very well with it.

The story is good, but at the same time an element of it feels…like fan fiction.  Amy Hennig, 1 of the 3 original writers, was the story consultant, but it was actually written by John Garvin, who is also the director of the game.  Nate and Sully are about 70-80% accurate when compared to the trilogy, and while banter plays a role in the series as a whole (aiding in the enjoyment factor), the banter in this game feels…forced.  Yes there’s sarcasm, tall tales, locker room jabs and deprecating humour, but here it felt like it was being thrown as fast as possible against a wall.  In ‘Fortune, ‘Thieves, ‘Deception (and ‘End…finished it recently), there is a delicate balance between the narrative dialogue and the character-developing chit-chat, but here the chit-chat is…fast…very fast.  There are few pauses in between lines and if their minds matched their mouths, they’re thinking as sharply as Doctors and improv comedians.  It doesn’t have the same weight as the main series in terms of danger, highs and lows.  But it’s a decent side-episode that follows (most) of the usual formula…minus the round-the-world chase.

The music is once again by Greg Edmundson, and most of it is recycled from the trilogy.  It’s still fantastic though.

The gameplay is good, and likes to utilise the various characteristics that the Vita brings, including the ability to either tap your jump by pressing your finger on the screen at where you want to go, or by simply using the analogue stick.  You’re also given the mini-games that include cleaning dirt off items by rotating it with the back of the vita and cleaning it by rubbing the Vita’s screen with your finger, as well as creating charcoal rubbings of the stone patterns.  You also have to swipe your finger across the screen in the right direction as part of a sequence in order to perform a successful melee attack.  Outside of simply exploring the areas and fighting the traditional way, much of these gameplay qualities come across as very gimmicky, and not necessary.

Would I recommend Uncharted: Golden Abyss?  Yes – but I don’t recommend it in the same way I would recommend the Uncharted trilogy.  Is it a good reason to get a Playstation Vita?  It’s 1 good reason – but Gravity Rush, Persona 4 Golden and several digital PSP games would make it much more worthwhile.  Is it a necessary part of the Uncharted Series?  I don’t think so.  But is it a good instalment to the Uncharted series for those who can’t get enough Uncharted?  Yes.

Graphics: ***** (For the Vita, **** in general)

Art Style: ****

Characters: ***1/4

Voice Acting: ****1/4

Gameplay: ***3/4

Story: ***

Music: *****

Overall: ****

Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception (2011/2015) Video Game Review

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Now for the second or last stretch before we tackle the most recent instalment…and The Golden Abyss.  Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception.

Our story begins in London, England (1 were the Victorian Architecture has survived and is occupied by Guy Ritchie’s Usual Suspects and the Chavs in Kingsmen: The Secret Service).  Drake and Sully come to do business with a man named Talbot, who gives them a pile of money for Drake’s ring.  When Drake and Sully notice the money’s fake, a huge brawl ensues before they get into trouble.  We are then thrown into Drake’s past, as a 15 year old thief running around Columbia meeting Sully for the 1st time, as well as Sully’s client that day – Katherine Marlowe, the main antagonist.  We then return to the present, which has Drake, Sully, Chloe (from ‘2) and Charlie Cutter (tough cockney englishman with a knowledge for history and a fear of tight spaces) go looking for what was stolen from them, and to stop it if it’s too dangerous.

Now to the chart through the characteristics:

The Graphics, up to that point, were the best looking in the series.  It was fantastic in 2011, and in the remaster it’s just as mesmerising as before.

The Art Style is…wow.  Among Thieves has a glorious presentation, and Drake’s Deception is no different in quality.  Instead of the Jungles in ‘1 and the Snowy Mountains in ‘2, our star landscape is the Arabian Desert – and without spoiling it (we’ll call it the “hard times level”), the presentation of the desert is…amazing!  Really amazing.  It was insane in 2011, and it’s still awe-inspiring today.  Excellent!  Great job!  I was taking screenshot after screenshot on my PS4 and sending it to my Facebook.  It’s 1 of my favourite things to look at in a video game, along with various other levels such as how London, the ship, the French Castle (my favourite) and the underground museum are presented.

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Hard times Bay Bay!

The Voice Acting is once again top notch.  Nobody was bad.

The Characters in Uncharted 3 are as good, sometimes even better than ‘2 and obviously better than ‘1.  I’ve found myself greatly disliking Marlowe and Talbot to the point of true hatred (something about English villains can do that in ways that Russians and Pirates can’t)…and I’ll get to another reason why their henchmen were particularly dislikable.

The Story is once again excellent – The premise is the same (Find an ancient civilisation or relic before the baddies), but she’s obviously wearing a different dress and hairstyle.  Moving on from South American treasure thieves and military-trained russians, we now take on the last Great American foe that isn’t German – the English.

The Music is, for the 3rd time, composed by Greg Edmondson, who did the music for Mike Judge’s King Of The Hill and Joss Whedon’s Firefly.  5 stars.  Moving on.

Gameplay-wise, Uncharted 3 is roughly as good as ‘2, but at the same time some of its extra features actually disturb its flow – primarily in the form of quick-time event fisticuff battles that Drake has.  It’s featured in the game’s opening since Drake and Sully walked in without guns.  But later on in the game it doesn’t have the same relevance.  Does it look good?  Yes.  But it does break it up when it didn’t need to be.  On top of this, some battles become so difficult that they reach a “troll” level (or if you’re into classic anime – think of the gun battles in Trigun), the amount of guns blazing in your direction, non-stop, and then the fact that they throw grenades at you within 30 seconds of you hiding in cover (while guns are blazing), surrounding you with gunfire when you least expect it, and of course the amount of terminator-endurance soldiers…It really makes you want to get your hands on the villains.  Some would call this an acceptable challenge to overcome – But these battles literally feel like they’re cheating as they appear to come out of the metaphorical clown car, are hard to kill, and your bullets run out faster than you would like them to (which is never).

Would I recommend Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception?  Much like Uncharted 2, definitely!  It’s not as good as Among Thieves, but it’s still a good bit better than Drake’s Fortune.  The gameplay is more inconsistent than ‘2, doesn’t flow quite as well, and is capable of being a troll in some battles.  The same goes for the story which doesn’t have as strong a flow as ‘2.  It’s a 5 star game…but it’s a lesser 5 star than Among Thieves.  Not quite as good in secondary characters, story and gameplay, but made up for with its slightly better graphics.

Graphics: ****3/4 (***** in 2011)

Art Style: *****

Voice Acting: *****

Characters: ****3/4

Story: ****1/2

Music: *****

Gameplay: ****1/2

Overall: *****

Uncharted 2: Among Thieves (2009/2015) Video Game Review

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2 years after the beautiful-looking, beautiful-sounding, fun-full playing, but slightly shallow-in-story introduction known as Drake’s Fortune came Among Thieves, a follow-up in story, and an opportunity to give us more of our favourite characters.  So…Among Thieves

Our story begi- best opening to a video game ever!!…or at least 1 of them.  It literally starts off with a bang, to the point that I’m not even going to mention it.  Play it and see what I mean.  So anyway, our story revolves around our hero, Nathan Drake, being given a new project to work on from old associate, Harry Flynn (Wise-cracking Australian thief), and his driver/girlfriend Chloe Frazier (Basically a naughty raven-haired Lara Croft with Lauren Bacall speaking in an Australian accent and goods that are very hot to handle).  What is the Project?  To steal a Mongolian Oil Lamp (which was once in possession of Marco Polo) from a Turkish museum, which contains information on the whereabouts of Shambhala, the legendary city mentioned in Tibetian Buddhist and Hindu texts.  After retrieving the lamp and finding the secret, in an obvious fashion, Nathan experiences a swerve, not by both of his partners, just Flynn.  After spending months in a turkish prison, Sully makes his return to the game to bail him out, and along with Chloe, go on an adventure to Borneo, to look for Marco Polo’s fleet and therefore get back on the road to finding Shambhala before Flynn does with his boss, the terrifying (and presumed dead) Serbian War Criminal known as Zoran Lazarević.

The Graphics, even today, look beautiful.  The scenes that feature the Tibet landscapes are legendary, and the chapters in the game where Drake was on a train…You would almost forget about fighting because you begin to realise “They have actually animated a train journey into a game’s level, and it’s unlike any approach that’s ever been done before!”  In the past,train levels would have been presented at certain angles with some movement in the background to save space on the disc, usually from a side-scrolling point of view…but this…this game took that to a whole new dimension!  The most detailed aspects of Final Fantasy VIII’s train scene was a cut scene, but this was in the actual gameplay!  That’s how amazing this was.

The Art Design direction took what Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune did well, and blew it out of the water…then it expanded further than that again, by providing scenarios that go beyond the Jungle, including cities, rural villages and the mountains in Tibet.

The Voice Acting sees the protagonists return to full form from where they left off, as well as feature a lot of new voices that perfectly match their respective character designs.

The Characters are awesome.  The protagonists are even better now than they were  in Drake’s Fortune, as they’ve developed a lot since then and the voice actors bounce dialogue off each other like they were some cinematic superhero clique.  The addition of Chloe Frazier to the protagonists added a little extra flavour to the dialogue, and the villains…compared to the villains in Drake’s Fortune, Among Thieves is so much better!  Unlike Gabriel Roman, Atoq Navarro and Eddy Raja, who are simply doing it for the money and without a care for the consequences of El Dorado’s power – Zoran Lazarević’s heroes include Hitler, Stalin and Pol Pot…so you know what this guy’s like already (Plus, you wouldn’t want to meet him in real life in any situation.  Even watching him play tea party with a daughter would be unnerving).  Also, Harry Flynn’s a funny guy – you might hate him, but at least he’s actually charismatic in a snaky way.

The Story…oh the story.  If you thought the opening to Drake’s Fortune was good, then wait until you see the opening of Among Thieves.  Then wait until you see the journey you’re taken on.  By the time you’re finished, you’ll have done so much and seen so much, that a 2nd play through feels oddly fresh, as it becomes like returning to a faraway place for a holiday.

The Music is once again done by Firefly composer Greg Edmondson.  Five stars.  Next.

The Gameplay of Uncharted 2 not only does everything that made its prequel great, but they’ve also added even more depth to it (Think Arkham City to Arkham Asylum).  At times, I experienced a small jump glitch, but they were very rare and not an inconvience.  At the same time, even on easier difficulties, the Enemy AI is oddly quite intelligent, which adds a lot to the game. Also, there is no lives feature, so feel free, much like in Drake’s Fortune, to try and try again until you get it right.

The camera work is perfect, and the cinematic choices used in the cutscenes were perfect.

Would I recommend Uncharted 2: Among Thieves?  YES!  Absolutely!  Even though it’s a sequel, the story is strong enough and written in such a way that it is capable of being a standalone game.  The story is a vast improvement over Drake’s Fortune, the villains (a problem in Drake’s Fortune) are ten times better and more interesting, the locations are not only of a greater variety, but their presentation is just awe-inspiring, the gameplay is a step-up in quality yet again, the music and atmosphere are perfect, the voice acting is perfect and the camera work is also perfect.  They didn’t call this the tied 3rd best game on the Playstation 3 (along with Batman: Arkham City and below GTA 4 and 5) for nothing, and even today, it deserves its place as a masterpiece in media, let alone video games.

Graphics: ****1/2 (***** in 2009)

Art Design: *****

Voice Acting: *****

Characters: *****

Story: *****

Music: *****

Gameplay: ****3/4

Camera: *****

Overall: *****

Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune (2007/2015) Video Game Review

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With Uncharted 4 already out, I figured I would start (or in my case, restart) playing all of the games in this series again – starting with the game that began them all; Drake’s Fortune.

So what’s the story?  Well, it revolves around our main character, Nathan Drake, a treasure hunter whose goal in life is to go searching for some of the greatest mysteries in the world and obtain them…Because it’s an exciting line of work and he has bills to pay, and isn’t willing to do anything else to pay them (Because dreams have an element of risk that make them worth trying).  After uncovering the coffin of his ancestor, the english explorer Francis Drake, Nate finds out that Francis faked his own death (no remains inside), and left clues to the location of the mythical treasure known as El Dorado.  So, Nathan, along with a journalist looking for a story, Elena Fisher, and his old mentor, Victor “Sully Sullivan,  set out to find it…and experience much trouble along the way.

To add an extra mention, I’m reviewing the PS4 upscale of this game, which is more or less the same game, only it has nicer textures and flows wonderfully at 60 frames per second (and possibly more).

Now to dive into the details.

The Graphics still hold up very well today, but when this game originally came out in late 2007, it was 1 of the best looking video games in the world, along with Assassin’s Creed 1 and Crysis ( or at least it had the best water texture at the time).  Even today you can’t go wrong with how this game looks and makes you feel just by looking at it.

The Art style attempts to be realistic in both background and character design, and especially for the time, it really succeeded.  Today it very much looks like a PS3 game (a great looking PS3 game for that matter), and with the likes of its sequels and Quantic Dream games such as Heavy Rain and Beyond: Two Souls, which came out on PS3 a few years later, it has dated a bit.  But it doesn’t take away from how beautiful the game still looks, with it’s bright greens, beautiful skylines, touchable looking masonry, and of course a realistic looking darkness when you start going through catacombs and temples.

The Characters are…mixed…at least in this instalment.  The characters themselves aren’t enormously developed, though Drake and Sully would be great craic to hang out with in real life (They’re a good humoured bunch).  And the villains are…terrible, and among some of the most typical stereotypes in any entertainment medium.  Seriously, the villains are as 1-dimensional as they get, and none of them come across as particularly threatening (Which, if your villain is 1 dimensional, is criminal in its own sense).  Nathan Drake himself is a great and likeable character, even this early in the series’ development.  Naughty Dog decided they didn’t want to make him like Schwarzeneggar or Rambo – but rather, more like a regular guy with good survival skills on an adventure bigger than himself.  Comparisons have been made with Tomb Raider, but some of the inspirations to the character are clear when mentioned, including Johnny Knoxville, Harrison Ford, Bruce Willis, and even Cary Grant.  There’s even a slight Nathan Fillion feel to the character as well, but no one mentioned it.  Sully reminds me of Walt Disney in appearance and is a great, comedic father figure to Nathan, while Elena Fisher is very much in “Season 1” mode, as an adventurous but naive journalist who hasn’t really experienced the nitty and gritty of her job…until this story takes place.  Our 3 main villains are Gabriel Roman, Atoq Navarro and Eddy Raja…and like I said, none of them have any redeeming qualities, they’re just greedy prats thinking about money, with Eddy Raja being the most annoying.

The Story in Uncharted 1 is, sadly, the weakest part of the whole game (Probably more so than the villains…okay, maybe not, they’re roughly on par).  It’s very simple, but it’s not that well executed or tight, and some of the more exciting parts of the game are very anti-climatic.  Nothing about it stood out in particular, as much of the game was more like an exhibition of the art work, and of “things to come”.  It was all new and interesting – and while it’s a good platform towards the sequels, it’s not the best game on it’s own.

The Gameplay very much borrows from the likes of Assassin’s Creed and Tomb Raider (and possibly Prince Of Persia), from its exploration features, to its treasure hunting, to its gunplay and melee, to its use of parkour to get around.  The gameplay itself is excellent and more or less bug free (I’ve found no flaws), however there have been times when I’ve jumped at a wrong angle and then had to go through a whole climbing level all over again.  Other than that, I have no objections, it’s still great fun to play.

The voice acting’s good, particularly from our heroes, whose voice acting choices are perfect for the characters they play.  Despite the quality of the villains, the voice acting’s still very good for them as well.

The Music is by Greg Edmonson, who also created the soundtrack for Joss Whedon’s show Firefly and the score for Mike Judge’s cartoon King Of The Hill.  You can hear a lot of Firefly similerities in this game’s score, and with that, the game’s music has an intense “love” factor from me – as it suits the sound of adventure perfectly.

Would I recommend Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune?  No doubt!  Despite the unfortunate story and 1-dimensional villains, it’s still a really good game.  It’s beautiful to look at, the heroes are likeable, the music is awesome and the gameplay is incredibly good fun.  It’s a game deserving of its sequel, and soon I’ll let you know about that 1 as well.

Graphics: **** (****3/4 in 2007)

Art style: *****

Story: ***

Gameplay: ****1/2

Voice Acting: ****1/4

Characters: *** (****1/4 for Drake, Fisher and Sully, ** for the Villains)

Music: *****

Overall: ****